Main Menu

Green Tea Polyphenols Protect The Skin

Green tea polyphenols have been reported to preserve tissues such as
blood vessels, corneas, nerves, islet cells, articular cartilage, and
myocardium. Research in Japan examined the effects of EGCG on skin
preservation. Utilizing epidermal and dermal skin cells in culture, the
researchers report that the tea polyphenol helped to preserve the skin
cells for up to seven weeks and allowed successful skin grafting. The
researchers commented that these findings suggest “the future
clinical usefulness of EGCG for skin preservation, however the
mechanism by which EGCG promotes skin preservation still remains
unclear.”

Green tea polyphenols affect skin preservation in rats and improve the rate of skin grafts.

Cell Transplant. 2008;17(1-2):203-9. Kawazoe T, Kim H, Tsuji Y, Morimoto N, Hyon SH, Suzuki S.
Green tea polyphenols have been recently reported to promote the
preservation of tissues, such as blood vessels, corneas, nerves, islet
cells, articular cartilage, and myocardium, at room temperature. These
findings indicate the possibility of a new method of tissue banking
without freezing. A main active ingredient of green tea,
epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), is a polyphenol that possesses
antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiproliferative, and free radical
scavenging effects. This study examined the effects of EGCG regarding
skin preservation. Skin sample biopsy specimens measuring 1 x 1 cm from
GFP rats were held in sterile containers with 50 ml preserving solution
at 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C for up to about 8 weeks. Periodically,
some of the preserved skin specimens were directly examined
histologically and others were transplanted into nude mice.
Histological examinations of skin preserved at 4 degrees C revealed a
degeneration of the epidermal and dermal layers from 5 weeks in all
groups. In the groups preserved at 37 degrees C, degeneration and
flakiness of the epidermal layer were demonstrated starting at 2 weeks
preservation regardless of addition of EGCG. After 2-7 weeks of
preservation the rat skin grafted to nude mice in the EGCG groups
stored at 4 degrees C showed successful engraftment. However, grafts
preserved at 4 degrees C without EGCG and at 37 degrees C did not
demonstrate GFP-positive keratinocyte or fibroblasts. In conclusion,
the present findings suggest the future clinical usefulness of EGCG for
skin preservation without freezing; however, the mechanism by which
EGCG promotes skin preservation still remains unclear.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply